Idiom: to make a splash

Definition: to attract a lot of attention; to get noticed

Examples:

Everyone is talking about the new movie. It really made a splash.

That new book is really popular. The author is on all the talk shows. She really made a splash.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to make waves

Definition: to create a significant impression; to cause trouble, to be disruptive

Examples:

At your new job, be sure to speak up at meetings. You want to make waves right from the start.

I didn’t know anyone at the dinner party, so I kept quiet. I didn’t want to make waves.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to put one’s foot in one’s mouth

Definition: to say something awkward or inappropriate

Examples:

  • I saw my boss on the street yesterday. He was with a woman. I said I loved his wife’s dress, but she wasn’t his wife. She was his girlfriend. I definitely put my foot in my mouth that time.
  • I thought the customer was about 65 years old. I told him he didn’t look a day over 50. He frowned and told me he was 45. My god, I think we are going to lose the account, just because I put my foot in my mouth.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to dig in one’s heels

Definition: to be stubborn, to refuse to move

Examples:

  • We tried to renegotiate the contract, but the customer dug in his heels. He said no, we could not discuss the contract again.
  • I wanted to go to the beach, but my wife wanted to go to the mountains. She dug in her heels, so maybe we’ll go to the beach next year.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to have the floor

Definition: to have permission to speak in a meeting

Examples:

  • The CEO had the floor for almost an hour during the meeting, but he didn’t have anything interesting to say. I fell asleep.
  • Excuse me, but I have the floor. Please wait until I’m finished speaking, and then you can say whatever you want.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: all hands on deck

Definition: a job or task requires everyone’s attention or help

Examples:

  • This new client is our biggest client so far. It’s really important that we serve them well. It’ll be all hands on deck for a while.
  • It’s August, and many people are on vacation, so our office staff is short this month. For the people left, it’s all hands on deck.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: scut work

Definition: boring, tedious, menial work

Examples:

  • Some people think a lawyer’s workday is filled with dramatic courtroom moments. In reality, however, much of a lawyer’s day is filled with scut work — reading long documents, going to boring meetings, and doing paperwork.
  • Even the most advanced, forward-thinking projects involve lots of scut work. The results may be glamorous and impressive, but the actual work involved is not.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: bang for the buck

Definition: value for the money

Examples:

  • When we advertise on the internet, we get a good bang for the buck. We don’t spend much money, but we get a lot of customers.
  • Our Maltepe service center gives us a better bang for the buck than the Şişli service center. It’s cheaper, and our customers like it better.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: crunch time

Definition: a short period when there’s high pressure to get results

Examples:

This month is the busy season for our business. If we do well, we’ll make tons of money. It’s crunch time.

I want to take a vacation, but it’s crunch time at work now. I will have to take a vacation later this year.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to have one’s finger in the pie

Definition: to be involved in something, to get a piece of the reward

Examples:

This is not the only company he owns. He has his finger in the pies of many other companies, too.

Almost every single person is involved in this project. Sometimes it seems like everyone has a finger in this pie.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to land an account

Definition: To acquire a new customer

Examples:

My boss told me we really need more business. Maybe if I land this account, he’ll promote me.

I’m not having a very good year, it has been a long time since I landed a new account.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: the fine print

Definition: The limits, conditions, qualifications, or other details printed at the bottom or end of a contract.

Examples:

The contract might look good at first, but you have to read the fine print to know for sure.

The cell phone company’s new promotion sounds great, but when you read the fine print, you realize their offer is worthless.

(Note: “the fine print” is also sometimes called “the small print”)

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to pull the plug (on something)

Definition: to cancel or stop (something)

Examples:

This new program will never be successful. We need to pull the plug on it, before we waste more money.

I was really excited about this new advertising campaign, but my boss didn’t like it, and he decided to pull the plug.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to plug (something)

Definition: to promote or sell (something)

Examples:

He was on the TV news last night, but he didn’t have anything interesting to say. He was just there to plug his book.

At job fairs, it’s hard to plug our company to potential recruits when we have such a bad reputation.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to keep something under wraps

Definition: to keep something secret, to keep something hidden

Examples:

Our development department is working on a new product. We can’t tell anyone, we have to keep it under wraps.

My boss is going to promote someone. I hope it is me, but I don’t know yet — he is keeping his decision under wraps until tomorrow.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: To tighten one’s belt

Definition: to cut back on expenses

Examples:

Sales are down, we need to tighten our belt until business is better.

You should tighten your belt, if you spend money like that, you’ll go out of business quickly.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: six of one and a half dozen of the other

Definition: two things are the same; the difference is zero

Examples:

The company is going to cut our pay, but increase our health insurance. So my paycheck will be smaller, but I won’t pay as much when I go to the hospital. I think it’s six of one, and a half dozen of the other.

If we import from country X, the price is higher, but the customs duty is smaller. If we buy from country Y, the price is lower, but the customs duty is higher. Either way, the total cost is the same, so I don’t care. It’s six of one, and a half dozen of the other.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to get off to a shaky start

Definition: to start roughly, to start badly

Examples:

The business is very successful now, but in the early days, we didn’t know if it would succeed or not. It got off to a really shaky start.

When you meet the new boss, it’s important to make a good first impression. You don’t want the new relationship to get off to a shaky start.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to fall off the radar

Definition: to disappear, to be invisible

Examples:

We were good friends for many years, but when he moved to South Africa, I lost track of him. I haven’t spoken to him in 10 years, and I don’t even know where he is now. He fell off my radar.

When our company was big, it got lots of press coverage. But now it’s small, and no one cares anymore. We fell off the radar.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to cut your teeth

Definition: to learn a new skill; to get basic experience

Examples:

He is a big, famous Finance Guru at the World Bank now, but he cut his teeth managing the finances for small textile factories in Egypt.

He is a great addition to our manufacturing team, because earlier in his career, he cut his teeth doing quality control at Toyota.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: To buy (something) for a song

Definition: to buy something for a really good price; to buy something cheap

Examples:

These days, a lot of banks are in distress, so they can be bought relatively cheaply. They can be bought for a song.

I bought this house for a song, when prices were cheap during the last real estate crash.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: Kill two birds with one stone

Definition: To solve two problems with only one action

Examples:

Last week the logistics department figured out how to deliver the customer’s goods early, and save money on shipping too. They killed two birds with one stone.

If you want the promotion, you need to work smarter than everyone else. Figure out how to do things more efficiently, kill two birds with one stone.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to take stock

Definition: to count, or to evaluate

Note: Sometimes this is used philosophically (as in, to evaluate one’s life), and sometimes it is used literally (as in, to actually count the number of inventory items sitting on the shelf).

Examples:

On major birthdays, many people take stock of their lives, and ask themselves whether they are headed in the right direction.

Three of our company’s top managers resigned this week. Before we continue the same old strategy, we need to take stock of our business, and decide where we want to go in the future.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be in the black

Definition: to be profitable, to be making money

Examples:

Our new startup lost money for two years, but now we are profitable. We are finally in the black.

Our company has a long history of financial strength. In fact, we have been in the black every year since 1972.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to come on strong

Definition: to overwhelm with excessively strong language or personality

Examples:

The salesman came on too strong at the meeting and made the customer angry.

The new employee has some really good skills, but he comes on too strong.  The other employees think he is arrogant and annoying.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to give the green light

Definition: to approve something, to give approval to something

Examples:

This marketing plan is great, but you have to show it to the boss first. Until he gives the green light, we can’t do anything with it.

I want to hire a new sales rep, so I checked with the sales manager. He gave me the green light, and I made an offer to the top candidate yesterday.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be in the ballpark

Definition: to be near a target, to be close to the target

Examples:

You haven’t told me your target price, but I think it is probably around $100,000. Am I in the ballpark?

The customer wants us to lower our price, he says we are way too expensive.  He says we aren’t even in the right ballpark.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to adjourn a meeting

Definition:  to end a meeting

Examples:

It was late in the evening, so we adjourned the meeting until the next day.

We’re not making any progress, let’s adjourn the meeting and go back to work.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: number-cruncher

Definition: an accountant, someone who works with numbers

Examples:

Our president is a good number-cruncher and understands the finances of our company.

I am an artist, but my brother is a finance guy. He is more of a number-cruncher.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to scale back (something)

Definition: to reduce or cut

Examples:

When Ayşe had a baby, she scaled back her hours to just work part-time.

Times are hard, and we are losing money. It is time to scale back our spending — we need to spend less.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a company town

Definition: a town dominated by one industry or company

Examples:

When the coal mine closed, the company town faced a severe economic crisis.

I come from a company town, where one company owns everything — the stores, the banks, the houses, and everything else.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to run short

Definition: to not have enough (in quantity)

Examples:

At the factory, we ran short of an important part, and had to close the production line.

They ran short of gasoline at the gas station and had to close early.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a bigwig

Definition: an important person, or a leader of the group

Examples:

When the company’s bigwigs came to visit the factory, we all had to change our work schedules to accomodate them.

That guy is the head of Marketing, he is a real bigwig in the company.  If you see him in the hallway, be sure to smile and say hello.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to drum up business

Definition:  to create new business, to find new customers

Examples:

Sales have been very slow lately. Do you have any ideas for drumming up business?

Our production capacity is too low to meet demand.  We don’t need more salespeople to drum up business, we need more factory people to make more product!

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a dog-eat-dog world

Definition:  a cruel and aggressive world, where people only look out for themselves

Examples:

Your company fired you two days after you had a heart attack? Well, it’s certainly a dog-eat-dog world!

Be wary of your other competitors, especially in this industry. If you make a mistake, they will jump all over it. It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: brownie points

Definition: Credit for doing a good deed, or for giving someone a compliment (usually a boss, teacher, or other authority)

Examples:

When I told the boss his new suit was very handsome, the other employees laughed and said I was just trying to score brownie points.

Sara scored brownie points with her boss when she volunteered to organize the company’s holiday party.

Note: This phrase is a mild insult. Use it when you are suggesting someone’s motives are shallow or self-serving.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to throw cold water (on something)

Definition: to discourage, to remove hope

Example:

Steve wanted to expand the business into China, but his boss threw cold water on the idea, and told him to focus on the domestic business.

I was eager to try our big new software system with the new customer, but they threw cold water on me, and told me they wanted the safer, older system.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to generate buzz

Definition: to get a lot of attention; to promote; to cause people to talk about a product or service

Examples:

Procter & Gamble’s new toothpaste was really popular, and people talked about it a lot. It generated a lot of buzz.

Facebook is in the newspapers a lot these days, it is generating a lot of buzz.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to call the shots

Definition: to make the decisions, to be the leader

Examples:

In this office, Joe is officially the boss, but everyone actually listens to Sarah first. She’s the one who calls the shots.

This group is so disorganized, I don’t even know who approves new plans. Who calls the shots around here?

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to take a nosedive

Definition: to collapse, fail, lose value quickly

Examples:

The stock market took a nosedive during the financial crisis.

If we lose permission to sell this product, our earnings will take a nosedive and we might go bankrupt.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to hold the line

Definition: to maintain the existing opinion, position, or status; to resist

Examples:

The employees are resisting the changes.  We need to train our team managers how to hold the line regarding this restructuring plan.

Our competition is attacking us hard on pricing, but we need to hold the line. If we drop our prices too, there will be a big price war and we will all lose.

By the way, this idiom was inspired by my Australian friend Serpil Şahin. Thanks, Serpil!

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to throw money at (something)

Definition: to try to solve a problem by spending money on something

Examples:

You can’t solve this problem simply by throwing money at it. You need to use imagination and brains and try new things.

The president of our company really wants to solve this problem.  He is willing to throw a lot of money at it.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to make a go of (something)

Definition: to produce good results, to succeed (especially with an experimental project)

Examples:

This project is difficult, but try it, and see if you can make a go of it.

Although he works very hard in his business, he has been unable to make a go of it and may soon go out of business.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to deliver the goods

Definition: to succeed, to get results, to complete a project successfully

Examples:

Sure, everyone likes him and he is fun to talk to, but can he produce results? Can he deliver the goods?

I highly recommend Murat — if the job is difficult and really important, you can depend on him. He always delivers the goods.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to sell like hotcakes

Definition: to sell very quickly, to sell really well

Examples:

Children’s toys were selling like hotcakes at the end of the year.

In the summer in Antalya, Efes pilsen beer sells like hotcakes.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to mean business

Definition: to be serious, to be determined

Examples:

Our boss means business when he tells everyone to work harder.

Don’t mess with them, they are determined to win. They really mean business.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to cut corners

Definition: to economize, to take a short-cut, to reduce quality in order to save money

Note: this idiom is usually negative — don’t use it when you want to express approval or support something

Examples:

During these hard times, we are tempted to cut corners to save money.  Resist this, because when times are good again, people will remember you sacrificed quality.

To design a really fantastic product, don’t cut corners.  If you cut corners, your product will just be average.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to bankroll someone (or something)

Definition:  to supply someone (or something) with money, to finance someone (or something)

Examples:

This new project will be very expensive.  We need to find someone to bankroll it.

The movie actor bankrolled his son while the son was producing his first movie.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: the bottom falls out (of something)

Definition: a collapse occurs, and a new low is reached

Examples:

Things were good at our company, until the founder died of a heart attack. Then, the bottom fell out of the company, and we all lost our jobs.

When the bottom fell out of the coffee market many companies had to stop doing business.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be in the running

Definition: to be a candidate, to be competing for something

Examples:

This is a very competitive bid. There are three very strong candidates in the running — our company, and two others. Only one of us will win.

After the interview, I felt very confident. I don’t know if I will get this job, but I am definitely in the running.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: across the board

Definition: including everyone or everything

Examples:

Our company decided to raise all the salaries. It’s across the board — everyone will get a raise.

Times are tough, and we need to cut expenses. All departments have to reduce expenses 10%. The requirement is across the board — there are no exceptions.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: make or break moment

Definition: an important moment that decides whether you will succeed or fail

Examples:

Today’s presentation in front of the board is very important. It will decide whether they approve our project and we get promoted, or they kill our project and fire us. It is a make or break moment for us.

This was a very important order, and we messed up the delivery schedule. The customer is very angry. This is a make or break moment. If we handle this well, we’ll keep the customer. If we don’t, we’ll lose him.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: meet and greet

Definition: a basic introductory meeting, often informal, where you meet a person (or people) for the first time

Examples:

This is a new customer, and we’ve never met them in person. Let’s schedule a short meet-and-greet, so we can introduce ourselves.

We didn’t do much at yesterday’s meeting. We have a new CEO, and it was basically just a meet-and-greet. He talked for a few minutes, and then it was over.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: low hanging fruit

Definition: things that are easy to do, and give quick results

Examples:

This project is really complicated.  It will take years to finish. Let’s start with the low-hanging fruit, so we get some benefits quickly, and feel like we are making progress.

The new CEO got the low-hanging fruit quickly, but anyone could do that. It’s too early to know if he will be successful later, when the really difficult work begins.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a cash cow

Definition: a source of a lot of cash; a big profit-maker

Examples:

That is one of our best products. It is a cash cow. If we killed it, this company would lose a lot of money.

That industry is very unpopular, and people want the government to regulate it more. But the government will never touch it, since the industry is a cash cow. It pays a lot of taxes.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a can of worms

Definition: a complicated problem, a tangled mess of problems

Examples:

If we layoff a few employees, it opens a can of worms.  You fire a few people, then the media says your company is sick, then investors start to worry, and your customers call your competitors, etc. The problems don’t stop coming.

If I am late to work today, it will open a big can of worms. My boss already doesn’t like me. He thinks I am lazy, and that I always miss my objectives. If I am late today, it will just make it worse.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to push the envelope

Definition: to test the boundaries, to try something new

Examples:

Our company is very conservative. Every presentation is always the same. I am going to push the envelope, and completely change the normal format.

I’m trying a new sales technique with this new customer. If it works, my boss will love me. If it fails, I will lose my job. Sure, it’s risky, but we need to try something new, to push the envelope.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: a rocky start

Definition: a difficult beginning, a rough start

Examples:

In the end, the project ended well — on time, and under budget. However, in the beginning, it had a rocky start — important employees quit, there was no clear direction, and there was no support from management.

Often, when you start a new project, it is important to start small. If you try something too big, you might get overwhelmed, and have a rocky start.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: in a pinch

Definition: in an emergency, in a difficult situation

Examples:

I don’t like fish, but if there is nothing else, I will eat it in a pinch.

I don’t know much about finance, but if I have to read an income statement in a pinch, I can do it.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to hit the nail on the head

Definition: to describe something perfectly, to identify the source of a problem perfectly

Examples:

We were trying to explain why last night’s party was so funny, but we couldn’t. However, Murat found the perfect words. He hit the nail on the head.

My boss likes my descriptions of our company culture. He says when I describe our company’s strange culture, I describe it perfectly and clearly — he says I always hit the nail on the head.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to take it down a notch

Definition: to reduce the intensity, to relax a little

Examples:

I am an intense person, and I was scaring our customers. My boss asked me to take it down a notch, to relax a little when we meet customers.

You have been working way too hard, and it is hurting your performance. Remember, this is a big project that will last two years. You need to take it down a notch.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: bait and switch

Definition: selling one thing, but delivering another thing (usually of lower value)

Examples:

In the store, the dining room table looked very nice. But the table they delivered to my home was very different — the wood was different, the construction was bad, and the color was wrong. It was a classic bait and switch sale.

Don’t buy from that company. They seem very friendly, but later, you will find the service is very bad. They have a reputation for “bait and switch.”

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to jump the gun

Definition: to act prematurely, to do something too early

Examples:

I should wait longer to agree to the price. I always jump the gun and agree too early, and we pay too much.

In life, patience is important. Don’t jump the gun all the time.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to split hairs

Definition: to analyze a subject down to trivial and unimportant details; to obsess over small disagreements, when you already agree on the bigger details

Examples:

I want to give the approval and all you want to do is split hairs about what color the body should be.

We agree on the bigger picture, and we even agree on most details. But I get really frustrated, because he keeps splitting hairs, arguing about really small details that don’t matter.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be under fire

Definition: to be under attack, to be criticized heavily

Examples:

Yesterday, I said some very offensive comments to my colleague. Today, I am under fire from the whole office. Everyone is demanding an apology from me.

Sales are down, and the Sales Manager is very unpopular these days. He is under fire from everyone.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: mom and pop

Definition: really small, family-owned, family-style, not corporate (it is an adjective)

Examples:

When I was a child, I lived in a small town. The only grocery store was a small mom-and-pop store. I never saw a large hypermarket until I was older.

When he started this advertising agency, it was just a small mom-and-pop agency. But it has grown, and now it is a large corporation employing thousands of people.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to play fast and loose

Definition: to act with no long-term plan, and break the rules, without thinking about ethics

Examples:

Enron was a fast-growing energy company in the USA, but they played fast and loose with their financial reporting. When the fraud was discovered, the company collapsed quickly.

Be careful with him. He is very creative, but he plays fast and loose with ethics. If you partner with him, he might hurt your professional reputation.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: by hook or by crook

Definition: to accomplish something using any method available, especially creative or unusual methods

Examples:

We have no money left in the training budget, but this course is important. We will sponsor the training, whatever it takes. We will do it by hook or by crook.

I was lazy, and did not study hard for the test. If I fail this class, I won’t graduate. I promise, I will pass this class, by hook or by crook.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to work out the kinks

Definition: to solve small problems, usually in a larger process

Examples:

Don’t worry about the small stuff yet. Let’s focus on the big picture, and we’ll work out the kinks later.

Before you introduce a new product, be sure to work out the kinks. Small problems are okay in development, but if you go public with them, they make customers angry.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to beat a dead horse

Definition: to belabor a point; to insist on talking about something that cannot be changed

Examples:

My boss hated my idea, and he said “no” quickly. But I continued to argue with him, and push my idea. I finally stopped, because I was wasting my breath. I was beating a dead horse.

I understood you the first time. You don’t need to keep saying the same thing, over and over and over. Stop beating a dead horse.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to go through the roof

Definition: to grow rapidly, unexpectedly, excessively

Examples:

The new product was a really popular, worldwide hit. Our company’s sales went through the roof.

This year, oil prices have gone up really high. Last year we thought they were already high, but now they are through the roof.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to hit the roof

Definition: to be very surprised and angry, shocked

Examples:

Last month’s sales numbers are terrible. When the CEO sees these numbers, he is going to hit the roof.

I didn’t expect the hotel bill to be so expensive. When I saw it, I just about hit the roof!

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: when pigs fly

Definition: never, not a chance

Examples:

The company I work for is very tight with money. I asked for a raise, and my boss laughed and said, “When pigs fly!”

I want to manage the sales department. However, my performance is not good, and no one likes me. I guess the promotion will have to wait until pigs fly.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to bite the bullet

Definition: to make a difficult or painful decision; to take a difficult step

Examples:

When demand was down, U.S. automakers had to bite the bullet and cut jobs.

I know tonight’s football match is big, but we have to finish this sales presentation. We have to bite the bullet, and work late tonight.

Origin: This idiom comes from the military. During the U.S. Civil War, doctors sometimes ran out of whiskey for killing the pain. A bullet would be put in the wounded soldier’s mouth during surgery. He would “bite the bullet” to distract him from the pain and keep him quiet so the doctor could do his work in peace.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: the devil is in the details

Definition: the details are very complicated; things look nice on the surface, but the details are bad

Examples:

The new building looks nice, but the landlord might be trying to trick us. Read the contract carefully. The devil is in the details.

I thought the agreement sounded good. However, later that day, when I read it closer, I realized it wasn’t a good deal. The devil was in the details.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: cold call

Definition: a sales call with no introduction; an unannounced sales visit

Examples:

I want to start selling to XYZ Company. However, I don’t know anyone there. I tried to get an introduction, but none of my friends know anyone, either. I will just have to give them a cold call.

It is hard to sell something when the customer doesn’t know you. If you have an introduction, that is better. Cold calling rarely works well.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to move mountains

Definition: to do something difficult; to do something impossible

Examples:

My boss asked me to save the failed project, but it was already too late, the project was completely dead. I told him sorry, but I can’t move mountains.

Changing a company culture is like moving mountains — very difficult, very tiring, and highly likely to fail.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: come hell or high water

Definition: regardless of difficulties or obstacles

Examples:

The market is in a big crisis, but we are determined to succeed. Come hell or high water, we will dominate the market.

This project is really important. I have to finish it, no matter what happens. My boss told me, “Come hell or high water, you have to finish this one.”

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to have or get a piece of the action

Definition: to have or get at least partial ownership of a project or business; to get benefits from a project

Examples:

My cousin’s business is growing really fast. He is looking for partners, and asked me if I’d like to join him. Of course, I said yes, because I want a piece of the action.

Cem is angry, because we didn’t invite him to join the project. He likes this business, and he wanted a piece of the action.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to leave someone hanging

Definition: to be uncertain, to be unsure

Examples:

My company announced future layoffs, but they didn’t tell us specifically who will be laid off. Will I keep my job, or will I lose my job? I don’t know, they left us hanging.

This meeting is really important. Is it today, or is it tomorrow? Let me know, don’t leave me hanging.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to pull the plug

Definition: to stop something, to discontinue something (usually because it is not doing well)

Examples:

The project was not going well, so we decided to pull the plug. Tomorrow is the final day.

If sales don’t increase immediately, we have to pull the plug. The investors want results now, they don’t want to wait longer.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to drop someone a line

Definition: to contact someone, to call or email someone (an informal, casual phrase)

Examples:

We are old friends, but we haven’t talked in three years. I will drop her a line to say hello.

When you are finished at the meeting, drop me a line, so we can discuss the details.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to touch base

Definition: to meet briefly, especially to discuss progress

Examples:

Next week, I will be traveling in Europe. However, let’s touch base each day, so you can update me about the project.

Your boss needs to hear from you. If you don’t already have a meeting scheduled, then at least send him an email, to touch base.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be as clear as day

Definition: to be obvious, straight-forward

Examples:

I trained Murat on the new procedure. He thinks it is difficult, but I think it is extremely simple, as clear as day.

The boss loves him, and every year they give him more responsibility, and more money. I think it is clear as day — they are preparing him for the promotion.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: water under the bridge

Definition: something in the past; something that is over, finished, forgotten

Examples:

We had a big fight last year, but we are good friends again. I don’t even remember what the fight was about — it is water under the bridge.

I made a huge mistake last month, and we almost lost a big customer. However, I quickly corrected the mistake, kept the customer, and my boss forgave me. Yesterday he said don’t worry, it is water under the bridge.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to cut a deal

Definition: to make a deal, to negotiate a settlement, to make a compromise

Examples:

We’ve been negotiating for months. It is time to end this. Let’s cut a deal and be finished.

I don’t know why they chose our competitor. He must have cut an amazing deal.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to be hard-nosed

Definition: to be stubborn, to be tough, unwilling to compromise

Examples:

My boss refused to let me take vacation in July. He said absolutely not. I tried to persuade him, but he was really hard-nosed.

This customer is a really tough negotiator. They are really hard-nosed. If we want to get their business, we need to be very persistent.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to stand on the sidelines

Definition: to not participate, to watch but not do

Examples:

Murat and Ahmet are having a big fight. I am going to stand on the sidelines, I am not going to get involved.

The company is going through hard times. Get involved with the rescue, don’t just sit and watch. If you just stand on the sidelines, the boss will get angry at you.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to make a mountain out of a molehill

Definition: to overestimate the importance of something; to take something small, and make it more important than it needs to be

Examples:

Yes, she made a mistake. But it’s really not that big. When you say we should fire her, I think you are making a mountain out of a molehill.

Here is a tip for feeling less stress: Keep things in perspective. Don’t make mountains out of molehills.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to turn the corner

Definition: to change (usually in a good way)

Examples:

Sales have been down for three years, but now they are increasing. I think we finally turned the corner.

This ERP implementation has taken so long to finish, much longer than we expected. But I think we finally turned the corner, and we will finish soon.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to take five

Definition: to take a short break, to rest for a short time

Examples:

We’ve been working really hard this morning. Let’s take five, and then meet again at 11:00.

It’s been a rough day. You need to rest. Take five and go to Starbucks for some coffee.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: light at the end of the tunnel

Definition: the end of bad times; good results coming from hard times

Examples:

It’s been really busy lately, and I am working 80 hours per week. But soon a slower time will come — I can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

These production problems never end. The machines keep breaking, the power keeps going off. But soon, we will have the problems solved. Now we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: big fish in a small pond

Definition: to be important or famous, but in a small group (note: this is not a positive idiom — if you tell someone they are a big fish in a small pond, they will get angry at you!)

Examples:

I am a top manager at this company, but the company is really small. I am tired of being a big fish in a small pond — I want to go work at a large international company.

He thinks he is really important, but outside his group, no one knows him. He is just a big fish in a small pond.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.

Idiom: to rack up (something)

Definition: to add up, to accumulate

Examples:

The shipping container is stuck in Customs. Every day it is delayed, the shipping company charges us money. We are really racking up a lot of demmurage charges.

Don’t pay the invoices late. When an invoice is late, our vendors charge us fees. If we are late, we will rack up the penalties.

About Matt Krause

Matt began his professional life as an import buyer, and since 2006 has been teaching companies how to connect with their investors and clients better. His clients work in Istanbul, Bucharest, and Sofia for companies like Allianz, 3M, P&G, Citibank, and Reckitt Benckiser. He also walked across Turkey and wrote a book about it.